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February 2017 Leadership Development Carnival

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

February 2017 Leadership Development Carnival

You can always tell it’s the start of a new month, because that’s when I share the newest Carnival with you. Sometimes just the link, but more often, like today, the entire post.

There’s lots of good stuff to help you grow, whether you are a positional leader or leader in the instance.

Also a good reference when you are faced with a difficult situation or just need intelligent information quickly.

So, without further ado…

leadership-carnival-5-300x134Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provided How to Say No Graciously. Beth recaps, “Beth Beutler refreshes us on an important leadership skill—saying ‘no’ with grace.” Find Beth on Twitter at @bethbeutler.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Culture Leadership Charge: Make Values as Important as Results. In this post, Chris charges leaders to elevate values to the same level of importance as performance results. Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership provided 6 Essential Characteristics for Leading Simplification. Dan recaps, “This guest post by Lisa Bodell explores the concept of “simplification” and the leadership characteristics required to succeed.” Find Dan on Twitter at @greatleadership.

Dana Theus of InPower Coaching contributed 5 Leadership Lessons From The Worst Bosses I’ve Ever Had. Dana writes, “I’ve had some pretty terrible bosses. In retrospect, I wouldn’t have it any other way. Not only did I learn a ton, but I began to claim my personal power by deciding I was done with being treated that way.” Find Dana on Twitter at @DanaTheus.

David Dye of Trailblaze submitted 9 Ways to Motivate Employees When You Don’t Set the Goals. David summarizes, “Whether you are a team leader, a mid-manager, or even the President, CEO, or Executive Director there will be times in your career where you are asked to meet goals that you did not speak into or, in some cases, even disagree with. David shares how you and your team can still thrive in these situations.” Follow David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shared What Great Teams are Made Of (It’s Not What You Might Expect). David writes, “Google was fascinated by the question of what makes for an effective work team, and recently studied hundreds of its own teams to determine why some performed better than others. They thought the answer would be the obvious – teams made up of the best and brightest people – but it wasn’t. The answer may surprise you…” Discover David on Twitter at @thoughtpartner

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center shared Do team values unite your team or divide it?. Jesse Lyn recaps, “ Identifying team values are a great way to create team cohesion. But if it’s not done right, it can actually create discord, as this short story shows. This article also includes 6 questions to ensure your team values unite your team and create a foundation of trust.” Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed Build Your Self-Confidence as an Anchor During Change. Jill shares, “Good leaders understand that self-confidence helps employees be more productive, but they can ignore their own confidence and its importance to personal development. Here are some easy tips to ensure you don’t get discouraged.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds provided Be Open to Outcome: The Leaderly Approach. Jim shares, “I chose this particular post because it’s about personal leadership and ordinary people stepping up to do good for society with no expectation of any form of remuneration. The setting happens to be the United States for my post, from the perspective of a Canadian. Given all the negativity in the media, we need to reflect on the good acts that people do each and every day.” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Jim Thomas of Development Dimensions International (DDI) shared The Dirty Little Secret About Expat Failure. Jim wrote, “An expat assignment can be a growth opportunity and a great adventure. But is it a smart career choice? In this post, I discuss the ways expat assignments can go wrong, and how many organizations don’t even bother to measure the ROI in their employee mobility programs.” Find Jim at @ddiworld.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted Don’t Let Your Work Speak For Itself: 3 Ways to Increase Your Visibility. Joel recaps: “Don’t just let your work speak for itself. It’s time you actively increased your visibility. Here are 3 ways to make that happen.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog shared Cater to Customers’ Desires to Achieve Customer Delight. John summarizes, “Customer delight requires understanding your customers needs and desires. Often even your customers don’t understand these well. Businesses that have a deep appreciation for what their customers, and potential customers, desire and that create systems to deliver solutions that delight those customers benefit greatly from that effort.” Find John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference contributed Less Talk, More Action: Where Do You Fall?. Jon asks, “What have you done lately to lend a hand and lead change? We cannot afford just small talk or empty talking heads. We need more doing. It’s time to act upon the change we wish to see.” Follow Jon on Twitter at @thindifference.

Julie Winkle-Giulioni of Julie Winkle-Giulioni provided Want to Institutionalize Career Development? Look for (or Cultivate) these Cultural Markers Julie recaps, “Does your organization have the cultural markers that enable authentic, sustainable career development? Julie’s article and the assessment it contains helps you answer this question.” Find Julie on Twitter at @julie_wg.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders contributed Stop this Terrible Habit You Don’t Even Know You Have. In the post, Karin points out a terrible habit many leaders have—and why you should stop it right away if you have it too. Follow Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Marcella Bremer of Leadership and Change Magazine provided How Can You Develop Your Personal Positive Power at Work?. Marcella recaps, “How can you develop your personal positive power at work? There are four levels to work on, starting with yourself: ME. Here’s the overview of the book that I am blogging! I hope you like it – in this era, we need as many positive agents as possible to make change happen.” Find Marcella on Twitter at @marcellabremer.

Mary Ila Ward of Horizon Point Consulting contributed Are Your Goals Comfortable, Delusional or Somewhere in Between?. She recaps, “Throughout January, Mary Ila has been talking about methods for goal setting to set us all up for a successful 2017. In this post Mary Ila looks at how we should step outside our goal comfort zones to achieve peak performance in 2017. ” Discover Mary Ila on Twitter at @maryilaward.

Michael Lee Stallard of Connection Culture provided What Disengaged Employees Would Say to the Boss (If They Could Be Honest). Michael recaps, “What if you could hear the honest truth about things disengaged employees wish you would do? Michael Stallard shares 6 ways that leaders can boost employee engagement.” Find Michael on Twitter at @michaelstallard.

Miki Saxon of MAPping Company Success contributed 3 Steps to Being a Great Boss. Miki writes, “Being a great boss has a lot to do with being a great worker, then fulfilling your own desires after you are promoted.” Discover Miki on Twitter at @optionsanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted Being an Inspired Leader. Neal recaps, “Inspired leaders know how to their employees well enough to inspire them to create and produce great work. Employees who are inspired by leaders contribute significantly than those who are not inspired.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader contributed 5 Reasons To Keep Recruiting When Fully Staffed. Paul summarizes, “If you have a full complement of people on your team, you may want to see the wisdom in staying in recruiting mode. The reasons may surprise you, but the benefits are tremendous.” Follow Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen submitted The Gift of the Present Moment: A Book Excerpt. Paula summarizes, “In this excerpt from The Five Thieves of Leadership by John Izzo, leaders are encouraged to learn how to center themselves in the present moment and, by doing so, to deter the happiness thief of control.” Follow Paula on Twitter at @biggreenpen.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust shared The Strategy Every Leader Can Use to Develop High-Performing Employees. Randy writes, “The performance of your employees is a reflection of your leadership. What does your team’s performance say about you? Randy shares new research from The Ken Blanchard Companies that points to the strategy any leader can use to develop high-performing employees.” Find Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Robyn McLeod of Chatsworth Consulting shared Slow It Down and Keep It Real. In this post, Robyn shares why being thoughtful, being present, focusing on the quality of our interactions not the quantity, and spending face-to-face time with others, helps us to slow down and put our relationships back in the center of our communications. Find Robyn at @ThoughtfulLdrs.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row submitted The Number One Way to Show Respect at Work. In this piece, Shelley reminds us of “a simple, but often neglected way to show respect to one another at work.”  Discover Shelley on Twitter at @shelleyrow.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership provided 5 Ideas to Help You Cultivate Leadership. Susan explains, “The ultimate sign of an effective leader is that they are cultivating leadership in others. Sometimes this happens naturally. Yet, more often than not, if you want to cultivate leadership, you need to be intentional.” Follow Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer submitted How Would You Answer This Question About Your Leadership? . Tanveer explains this piece shares, “A question every leader should be asking themselves in order to figure out how successful their leadership will ultimately be.” Discover Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Thom Pirone of Stronghold Training shared Thoughts on the Death of a Leader. In this memorial post to a revered mentor, Thom reflects on the three marks of a genuine leader, including how the impact they leave will be personal and profound. Follow Thom on Twitter at @strongholdthom.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership submitted 3 Ways Excellent Leaders Keep Getting Better. Wally recaps, “Great leaders keep getting better. Here are three ways.” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

Willy Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts provided 8 “Whats” to Engage and Mentor. Willy explains, “Key challenges for leaders to retain the best talent are to keep their staff engaged with the enterprise and to provide effective mentoring to help them grow and develop.  This post suggest 8 key “WHAT…” questions to support your staff in each area. Discover Willy on Twitter at @coachforexecs.

January Dose Of Leadership

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

The monthly Leadership Development Carnival provides you with two useful things.

First, good info on a variety of “wetware” (AKA, people) issues, such as culture, leadership, management, etc.

Second, it introduces you to solid sources on these subjects with whom you may be unfamiliar.

So dig in and garner the intel that will help make 2017 a banner year for you.

So without further ado, here is the January 2017 Leadership Development Carnival.

leadership-development-carnival

Art Petty submitted Leveling Up to Change is THE Issue. Art summarizes, “For all of us, the need to help our firms navigate change while doing the same in our careers defines our level-up challenge.” Follow Art on Twitter at @artpetty.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provided The Day I Messed Up. Beth recaps, “This post elaborates on some thoughts about when the mistake is your own.” Find Beth on Twitter at @bethbeutler.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Culture Leadership Charge: The Right Culture Matters. In this post, Chris shares a real-world example of a client that did some “culture refinement” to improve employee engagement and customer service. Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dana Theus of InPower Coaching contributed Workplace Advice-Why Should I Bother Feeling Grateful For a Crappy Boss?. Dana writes, “When you have a tough work situation, finding ways to feel gratitude and appreciation can go a long way to turning the situation around, but is it really the best strategy? Often gratitude is the last thing you feel. Here’s how effective leaders approach gratitude in tough situations.” Find Dana on Twitter at @DanaTheus.

David Dye of Trailblaze submitted How to Lead When Everything Goes Crazy. David summarizes, “People act irrationally, circumstances change, and the truly unforeseeable happens. The good news is that you don’t need a specific step-by-step plan for the infinite number of problems you might face. David shares a better way to meet your leadership challenges.” Follow David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shared 7 Things Every Employee Wants from Their Boss. David writes, “What do employees want? While the answer varies by employee, our research and work reveals a collective ‘wish list’ every boss should know. Best of all, everything on the wish list is free.” Discover David on Twitter at @thoughtpartner.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed Everyday Recognition Matters Most. Jill shares, “At year-end leaders often think about how to thank their teams. The best leaders weave recognition into every day so that no one feels undervalued.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center shared Do an Ethics Check to Navigate the Gray Zone. Jesse Lyn recaps, “It’s easy to know what’s ethical when your choices are clear-cut. But there’s a huge gray zone where the choices are not so clear. Ethical decision-making can be challenging in our personal lives. And, when you are in a role that impacts others, it becomes even more critical. Use these 3 questions to provide ethical leadership through the gray zone.” Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds provided Why America is Good and Great. Jim shares, “I chose this particular post because it’s about personal leadership and ordinary people stepping up to do good for society with no expectation of any form of remuneration. The setting happens to be the United States for my post, from the perspective of a Canadian. Given all the negativity in the media, we need to reflect on the good acts that people do each and every day.” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted The 16 Ways to Improve Your Work Performance in 2017. Joel recaps: “Learn the 16 ways to improve your work performance in 2017. These tips will help you start 2017 with a great year.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog shared Podcast: Increasing the Capability of the Organization. John summarizes, “Changing how organizations are managed makes a huge difference in people’s lives. When this is done well people can go from dreading going to work to enjoying going to work, not every single day – but most days.  And it can change our lives so that most of the time we are doing things that we find valuable and we enjoy instead of just going to work to get a paycheck so we can enjoy the hours that we have away from work.” Find John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference contributed Join One20: A Day to Do Good. Jon shares, “Our country is divided. It’s time to heal our wound. On election day we need to show our good side, our good character, and do some good in our communities.” Follow Jon on Twitter at @thindifference.

Jon Verbeck of JonVerbeck.com provided The Key is Profit. In this post, Virtual CFO Jon Verbeck helps readers get back to basics—explaining that we’re in business to make a profit (which can help us do good things). Business owners must not ignore the goal of making a profit. Find Jon on Twitter at @jonverbeck1.

Julie Winkle-Giulioni of Julie Winkle-Giulioni provided The Magic of Making an Effort Julie recaps, “In a world where perfection and achievement are the eternal standard, effort might count for a lot more than many of us realize.” Find Julie on Twitter at @julie_wg.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders contributed 5 Questions to Help You Resolve Your Conflict. In the post, Karin reflects on a conflict that happened over the holidays, and what she and David Dye learned from it. Follow Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Linda Fisher Thornton of Leading in Context submitted Ethical Leadership is a Fear-Free Zone. Linda summarizes, “Fear is the toxic ingredient in many failed leadership strategies. In a fearful mode we may ‘rule out’ positive strategies that would help us solve collective problems – including dialogue, cooperation, long-term thinking and listening to understand.” Follow Linda on Twitter at @leadingincontxt.

Marcella Bremer of Leadership and Change Magazine provided The 21 Best Articles on Positive Leadership, Culture, and Change. Marcella recaps, “I support positive organizations where both people and performance thrive. Positive organizations are better at change, more innovative, competitive, profitable, and they contribute to the world – while engaged people spread their positive vibes everywhere. Here’s a list of my best liked 21 articles to date- which do you like best?” Find Marcella on Twitter at @marcellabremer.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services LLC submitted Ten Daily Practices that Show Respect to Your Team. Mary Jo summarizes, “Showing respect for your team helps them to be motivated, dedicated and loyal. The word gets out and you become a talent magnet. Here are some great ways to show your respect on a daily basis.” Follow Mary Jo on Twitter at @mjasmus.

Mary Ila Ward of Horizon Point Consulting contributed Bridging the Divide… Education for the Future. She recaps, “A country divided is what we are all hearing. I’m tired of hearing it, aren’t you? But as I examine the problem, I realize, like we all are, I am a part of it. So let’s do something about it! The solution is education!” Discover Mary Ila on Twitter at @maryilaward.

Mary Schaefer of Artemis Path, Inc. submitted One Way to be the Change You Want to See in Your Life. Mary summarizes, “You want to eliminate an unhelpful habit, address a hot-button issue or negotiate a change at work. You can take charge. Practice making a challenging change. There’s no substitute for firsthand experience.” Follow Mary on Twitter at @maryschaefer.

Miki Saxon of MAPping Company Success contributed 56 Words That Will Change Your Life. Miki writes, “The best advice isn’t complex or filled with multi-syllabic words. It is simple to understand and takes hard work to implement it consistently. However, the payoff is definitely worth the effort.” Discover Miki on Twitter at @optionsanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted Happy New Year 2017: A Change to Be Creative in Your Business. Neal recaps, “With the New Year, change takes place. Here is your opportunity to boost your idea for creating and producing a breakthrough result of your own. These tips will help you move forward in your creativity and profit from what you create.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader contributed 20+1 Thoughts for Reinventing Your Leadership. Paul summarizes, “Even leaders can get stuck in a rut of ineffective and stale leadership. Here are some quick thoughts to turn yourself around and reinvent your leadership impact.” Follow Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen submitted Six Lessons from Six Years. Paula summarizes, “Although Rakan Stormer did not reach adulthood and become a leader in business, public service, or the arts, his life taught lessons every leader should heed.” Follow Paula on Twitter at @biggreenpen.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust shared Too Many Priorities? 3 Tips to Focus on What Matters Most. Randy writes, “The excitement of starting off a new year can cause us to set too many goals that we don’t have a realistic chance of completing. That leads to us feeling ‘over:’ overwhelmed, overcommitted, and overstressed. To avoid feeling “over” in 2017, Randy Conley offers 3 tips to focus on what matters most.” Find Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Russ White and Jay Anderson of Development Dimensions International (DDI) shared Agile Ready Leaders Get Their Start in Kindergarten. Russ and Jay write, “To lead a cultural transformation to Agile, leaders require a very specific mindset. In this post, we discuss the four tenets of leading in an agile environment: Be Honest, Be Kind, Be Responsible, and Work in Small Increments.” Find Russ and Jay on Twitter at @ddiworld.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row submitted Come Out of the Closet: 4 Ways to Talk About Intuition at Work. About this piece, Shelley says, “We sometimes look down on ‘intuition’ as a reliable way to make business decisions, but intuition is an important part of the process.”  Discover Shelley on Twitter at @shelleyrow.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership provided How to Find a Mentor. Susan explains, “Potential mentors are all around you. You may even have one or more, and simply have not recognized them for their role as a mentor in your life. If you are in search of a mentor, often all you need to do is look around you and ask for the support you need.” Follow Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer submitted A Year-End Note Of Inspiration To Keep Pushing Ahead. Tanveer explains the post is “an end-of-year note to inspire leaders to challenge their outlook and understanding for how they will empower the best in those they lead.” Discover Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership submitted Learning to Lead. Wally recaps, “Learning to lead isn’t easy or automatic and it’s sometimes painful. But that’s the only way to get better.” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

December Leadership Development Carnival

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

leadership-carnival-5-300x134Can you believe it? Blink three times and the year disappears. Hopefully, you’ve learned a lot this year and grown in many ways. Now choose the posts from this month’s carnival that will add an edge to what you’ve already learned.

Verity Creedy writes I Believe I Can Fly: Leadership that Inspires Innovation
Learn the three conditions that we as leaders should be setting for our teams to create and execute innovative change.
Follow Verity on Twitter: @VerityDDI

Julie Winkle Giulioni shares “Not My Decision”: Constructive Responses to Workplace Decisions You Wouldn’t Have Made
Last week, many Americans had a profound experience of what employees encounter routinely on the job: responding to a decision they don’t support but must still live with. In organizations worldwide, strategies are set, markets are selected, tactics are identified…and not everyone agrees with the direction. When confronted with these situations, it’s easy for employees to feel powerless and out of control. Yet no matter the issue or the organizational level (of those deciding or those following in the wake of the decision), what remains well within each individual’s control is how he or she responds.
Follow Julie on Twitter: @julie_wg

Julie Baron wrote How to Prevent Leadership Derailment
You made it to the leadership position you have been striving for, but what must you do to avoid derailment? Learn the derailment behaviors and traits witnessed by business leaders in corporate catering, industrial distribution, construction, web design, HR technology, gift giving, marketing, and structural engineering.
Follow Julie on Twitter: @commwrks

Dana Theus shares What to Do If You’re Worried About Getting Laid Off
Dealing with the dread of being laid off can be a gift in disguise. Use the possibility of a layoff to get proactive about your career and personal brand.
Follow Dana on Twitter: @DanaTheus

JesseLyn Stoner writes How to Talk about Politics at Work
How do you talk about politics with people whose views are different than your own? It’s not a good idea to assume that everyone agrees with your views. One thing the U.S. elections showed was that what people say and what they actually believe are not always the same. And it also showed that we need to reach across the divide and try to understand what’s really driving each other. Here are six guidelines that will help your conversations be more informative and productive.
Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter: @JesseLynStoner

Randy Conley shares 6 Strategies for Leading When People Won’t Follow
Leadership is tough enough when things are going well, much less when people are resisting your leadership. In this post, Randy Conley shares six practical strategies leaders can use to help them deal with team members who won’t follow their lead.
Follow Randy on Twitter: @RandyConley

Mary Jo Asmus wrote Your Discomfort is Whispering to You
The discomfort you feel is normal and the tendency to avoid difficult conversations is common. Listen to your gut – it’s telling you that it’s time for you to step into that uneasiness and be a leader. This post provides practical advice on where to begin.
Follow Mary Jo on Twitter: @mjasmus

David M. Dye shares Why Do So Many Leaders Suck?
Perhaps the most common question David is asked after he shares Winning Well leadership tools is: “If this works, why are there so many lousy leaders?” In this article, David shares ten reasons leaders run into problems and how you can avoid falling into the same traps.
Follow David on Twitter: @davidmdye

Tanveer Naseer writes 3 Important Lessons Leaders Can Learn From Success
Three important lessons leaders can learn from success that will help them inspire and motivate employees to bring their best efforts over the long run.
Follow Tanveer on Twitter: @TanveerNaseer

Jon Mertz shares The Coming Day After
Regardless of your feelings about our most recent election cycle, we must all work together to end the divisiveness, stalemate, and finger-pointing. No matter our segment, our status, or our role, we must dig deeper, resolve challenges, and renew our greater purpose.
Follow Jon on Twitter: @ThinDifference

Anne Perschel wrote Your Leadership Megaphone Instruction Manual
Your leadership megaphone comes with the role, and it’s always on. People use it to broadcast what they THINK you said, and the results are not always what you intended. This instruction manual will help you use your megaphone wisely.
Follow Anne on Twitter: @bizshrink

Michael Stallard shares What Mayo Clinic Discovered About Burnout
Could something as simple as having a meal with colleagues to discuss work experience-related issues help reduce burnout? Michael Stallard explains what Mayo Clinic researchers found.
Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelstallard

Wally Bock writes about Leadership Theology
Our discussions of leadership have begun to sound like theological debates.
Follow Wally on Twitter: @wallybock

Karin Hurt shares 7 Reasons to be a Little More Grateful at Work
Karin Hurt takes time to reflect on the things to be truly grateful for at work, and encourages us to do the same.
Follow Karin on Twitter: @letsgrowleaders

Chris Edmonds writes Culture Leadership Charge: The Weakest Link
Chris Edmonds continues his Culture Leadership Charge series with this discussion of the cost of tolerating selfish, competitive players in your culture.
Follow Chris on Twitter: @scedmonds

Shelley Row wrote Give the Gift of Attention: Three Steps You Can Take Today
Shelley gives us practical tips for sharing one of our greatest gifts with others—our attention.
Follow Shelley on Twitter: @shelleyrow

Jon Verbeck shares But I’m Not an Accountant! Why Every Business Owner Still Needs to Understand Basic Financial Statements
Jon Verbeck shares a down-to-earth explanation of the three most vital financial statements with which EVERY business owner should be familiar.
Follow Jon on Twitter: @jonverbeck1

Beth Beutler wrote A Project Management Lesson from a 6-Year-Old
Beth shares some project management tips that were inspired by a 6-year-old tackling what could have been an overwhelming project of his own.
Follow Beth on Twitter: @bethbeutler

Joel Garfinkle covers How to Get Your Ideas Heard at Work
People have difficulty getting attention, let alone getting their ideas accepted and implemented. Here are three things that you could do right now to get your ideas heard at work.
Follow Joel on Twitter: @JoelGarfinkle

Susan Mazza shares How to Overcome the Tyranny of Your To Do List
To-do lists can easily transform from a useful tool to stay focused and productive to becoming an ever present reminder of all that you are not getting done. Even though you know not everything on that list is a “must do,” it is easy to get lost in the abundance of the “should do’s” that so easily pile up over time!
Follow Susan on Twitter: @SusanMazza

Neal Burgis writes Employees to Bring Ideas to the Table
Leaders need to rely and trust employees to use their creative thinking skills to generate ideas and produce results. Allowing room for your employee’s ideas helps leaders reduce supervisory control over the solutions to problems, challenges, and difficulties. The ideas employees put out generates various alternative solutions instead of one solution to what leaders want for their clients.
Follow Neal on Twitter: @exec_solutions

Mary Ila Ward shares HR Santa Clauses focus on the Employee Experience
This holiday season, HR and Talent Management leaders may need to consider a different approach on employee engagement. Mary Ila compares her real life experience of Christmas shopping for her children to how HR Santa Clauses focus on employee engagement. After all, maybe experience is what drives the engagement.
Follow Mary Ila on Twitter: @MaryIlaWard

John Hunter writes Add Constraints to Processes Carefully
Product and service design impacts the user experience. When the product is needlessly complicated and includes needless constraints it is the opposite of mistake-proofing, it is mistake-promoting.
Follow John on Twitter: @curiouscat_com

David Grossman covers The Top Reason People Resist Change and How to Best Address It
People resist being forced to change without their involvement. They don’t like change forced down their throats. People naturally resist being controlled and being uninvolved in decisions that affect them.
Hat tip to DDI World for hosting the December Carnival.

November Leadership Development Carnival

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

Here we are; a third of the way through the fourth quarter and two great things are happening today.

  1. We can all celebrate: no more political ads. Hooray!
  2. I’m sharing some great information from some of the best thinkers on all the subjects it takes to be a great boss/leader/manager these days.

So dig in, enjoy, and learn.

leadership-carnival-5-300x134Anne Perschel of Germane Coaching and Consulting submitted How Real Leaders Apologize and Mean It. Anne summarizes, “Real leaders don’t apologize AS IF they mean it. They actually mean it because they are empathetic. Empathy is the first of four elements in a genuine apology.” Follow Anne on Twitter at @bizshrink.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provided How to Get Along with the Colleague Who is Faster Than You. Beth recaps, “Do you sometimes have to work with a colleague whose pace is faster than yours? Beth Beutler gives some techniques for navigating swift waters in business relationships.” Find Beth on Twitter at @bethbeutler.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Culture Leadership Charge: Be Present. In this post, Chris charges leaders with the importance of being fully present, so they don’t send a message of “you’re not that important.” Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership provided Leaders Should Define More Than the Mountain Top, but Less Than the Whole Plan. Dan recaps, “When it comes to defining their vision, leaders tend to fall into two camps. Camp one can clearly articulate a mountain top they want to reach, but create zero clarity on how they’re going to get to that mountain top. Camp two has their mountain top defined and they also have a step-by-step guide to get from where they are today (base camp) to their mountain top. Both camps fail to create sustained motivation in their people. Guest author Hamish Knox explains why.” Locate Dan on Twitter at @greatleadership.

Dana Theus of InPower Coaching contributed Dear Dana Workplace Advice: New To the Team And Dealing With Workplace Bullying By A Colleague. Dana writes, “Dear Dana, I recently joined a new team and one of my colleagues is treating me like the hired help! I’m not sure what to do since I am new on the team and don’t want to get a reputation early on for being difficult or refusing to do work. Help! — Signed, Between a rock and a hard place in Iowa.” Find Dana on Twitter at @DanaTheus.

David Dye of Trailblaze submitted How to Lead When It Looks Impossible. David summarizes, “Every leader faces challenges that look impossible. David offers encouragement and practical next steps based on a recent mountain he and Karin Hurt climbed.” Follow David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shared 7 Requirements of a Strategic Messaging Methodology. David writes, “What is a Strategic Messaging Methodology, and what can it do for you, your leaders, and your organization? Simply put, it’s a process that helps you think strategically about how you develop your story, drive alignment, and tell it powerfully—whether it’s a large organizational story or whether you want to communicate change inside your organization. ” Discover David on Twitter at @thoughtpartner.

Evan Sinar of Development Dimensions International (DDI) provided LeaderPulse: The 5 Most Valuable Gifts Most Leaders Aren’t Getting. Evan recaps, “If you missed Boss’s Day last month, it’s never too late for employees to recognize their life-changing leaders. We looked to our research to come up with five less common, but more valuable gifts.” Find Evan on Twitter at @evansinar.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed They Told You What They Think of You, Now What?. Jill shares, “Getting 360 degree feedback anonymously can be overwhelming and cause anxiety. Jill explains how you can pluck out the meaningful messages and take positive action.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center shared  7 Fail-Safe Steps to Increase Responsibility and Develop Your Team . Jesse Lyn recaps, “If you’re not offering your people the opportunity to grow – to increase their responsibility and learn new skills – you are going to lose them. But increasing responsibility without also delegating authority is a recipe for disaster. And simply delegating is not always the answer either.” Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds provided Samsung’s Failed Executive Leadership. Jim shares, “Being the top leader of an organization, whether in the public or private sphere, is no easy task. What’s more appropriately called executive managerial leadership (as opposed to the overused, feel good term “leadership”), those at the helm of companies or government agencies have huge responsibilities.” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted 5-Step Plan to Developing Your Personal Brand. Joel recaps: “Have you developed your personal brand? No? Then it’s no surprise that you’re not moving up in your career. Implement this 5-step plan for career advancement.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog shared Bell Labs Designing a New Phone System Using Idealized Design. John summarizes, “The basic idea of idealized design is to create a new design for a product, service or the organization based on what is feasible today (but without being limited by the constraints of the existing state). Then, use that ideal to guide you as you figure out a plan to move from the existing state to that idealized design.” Find John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference contributed Discontentment: A Great Leadership Challenge. Jon shares, “Discontentment seems to be reaching epidemic proportions. What can we do as leaders to begin to unravel it? ” Follow Jon on Twitter at @thindifference.

Jon Verbeck of JonVerbeck.com provided The Dashboard May be the Most Important Part of Your Company Vehicle. In this post, Virtual CFO Jon Verbeck explains the important parts of a financial dashboard for your company. Find Jon on Twitter at @jonverbeck1.

Julie Winkle-Giulioni of Julie Winkle-Giulioni provided Whoa! What are today’s most common leadership mistakes? Julie recaps, “As counterintuitive as it may seem, well-meaning leaders undermine staff development – and ultimately results – not because they are doing too little but because they are doing too much.” Find Julie on Twitter at @julie_wg.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders contributed 7 Things Your High-Performance Employees Long to Hear You Say. Karin recaps, “Your high-performing employees never seem like the MIT (Most Important Thing), but the truth is, when I meet with them and ask what they need, I hear about things they long for from their boss.” Follow Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Lisa Kohn of Thoughtful Leaders contributed Four Key Steps to Being, and Getting More Done. Lisa shares why we need to spend at least as much time “being” as “doing,” and how to do this in our too-busy world. Follow Lisa on Twitter at @thoughtfulldrs.

Marcella Bremer of Leadership and Change Magazine provided The Power of Less: Get More Done. Marcella recaps, “I love Leo Babauta’s message from The Power Of Less. It sounds so simple, but it’s easier said than done: Identify the essential and eliminate the rest. If you spread yourself too thin; it dilutes your power and effectiveness. Do you do little of too many things? Or do you focus on just one big goal?” Find Marcella on Twitter at @marcellabremer.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services LLC submitted Do Less and Be More of a Leader. Mary Jo summarizes, “Being a people leader requires you to shift your mindset into knowing who you are and developing yourself within that framework.” Follow Mary Jo on Twitter at @mjasmus.

Mary Ila Ward of Horizon Point Consulting contributed Leaders and Runners, Don’t Run the Race Alone. She recaps, “In ‘Leaders and Runners, Don’t Run the Race Alone,’ Mary Ila encourages leaders to arm themselves with a wingman or wingwoman and provides tips on how leaders can gain ‘wing strength,’ emphasizing that ‘All runners, and leaders, especially those out for the long haul, need a wingman.’” Discover Mary Ila on Twitter at @maryilaward.

Michael Lee Stallard of Michael Lee Stallard submitted Finish 2016 Strong: Refocus, Reconnect, Reenergize . Michael shares, “With 2016 rapidly drawing to a close, now is the time to establish your plan to finish the year strong. Michael Stallard shares advice for leaders on meeting year-end goals.” Follow Michael on Twitter at @michaelstallard.

Miki Saxon of MAPping Company Success contributed Golden Oldie: Customer Service Week 2016. Miki writes, “There is much talk, and even some action, about “enhancing customer experience,” but, when you’re a line manager, who exactly are your customers?” Discover Miki on Twitter at @optionsanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted Leaders, Start Viewing Setbacks as Opportunities. Neal recaps, “Too many leaders get flustered when a business setback occurs. You need to take a step back and look at what happened and take action to move forward.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader contributed How To Lead With A Sandbox Culture. Paul summarizes, “Striking a balance between cultural and operational parameters that allows your employees room to innovate is always a challenge. Thinking of it as a sandbox in a playground will help that balance.” Follow Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust shared 10 Ways Leaders Can Easily Build Trust with Their New Teams. Randy writes, “Trust doesn’t ‘just happen’ by accident. It takes intentional effort and leaders need to have a specific game plan to establish and nurture trust in relationships. Randy Conley offers advice from the trenches in this post.” Find Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row submitted Pushing a Wheel Chair: Lessons in Servant Leadership. In this piece, Shelley shared lessons learned about servant leadership as she took on caregiving responsibilities for her husband.” Discover Shelley on Twitter at @shelleyrow.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership provided I Choose to Honor You. Susan explains, “If we truly want to be constructive participants and collaborators in our democracy, we need to bring a better spirit to our conversations with each other. We need to start talking with one another about the things that are hard to talk about, to engage in conversations with people who do not look or think like us, so we can learn. We need to be far more curious and much more discerning about what we believe and what we think we know, and seek truth rather than assume we are being told the truth.” Follow Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer submitted Why Expressing Gratitude Through Our Leadership Matters. Tanveer explains the post is, “A look at how expressing gratitude can help leaders bring out the best in those they lead and drive their organizations to succeed.” Discover Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership submitted Thoughts on Retirement and Purpose. Wally recaps, “People need a purpose. Without purpose, there’s not much reason to get up in the morning.” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

Ducks in a Row: September Leadership Development Carnival

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

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The 2016 election season is already too long.

Not to mention too divisive, too nasty, too hateful and devoid of any sign of real leadership

While we can’t hope for an actual leader, as described in this month’s Carnival,  that doesn’t mean you can’t emulate many of the qualities described no matter your position — just tweak them a bit to fit the situation.

Anne Perschel of Germane Coaching and Consulting submitted Golden Rules for Leading Transformation. Anne summarizes, “When the CEOs of Ford Motor Company, Nokia, and Microsoft began changing their respective companies’ core business and/or culture, they each established golden rules for leading transformation. Learn from them how to do the same for your company.” Follow Anne on Twitter at @bizshrink.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provided Why I’ve Cut Back Working at Coffee Shops. Beth recaps, “Many leaders work in locations outside of their own office from time to time. But it may not always be as productive. In this post, I share some downsides to working at coffee shops.” Find Beth on Twitter at @bethbeutler.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Leading a Purposeful, Positive, Productive Culture. Chris reminds us of the important part our company culture plays in getting the results we want. Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership provided 10 Ways to Kill Off Your Star Employees. Dan recaps, “Unfortunately, organizations don’t always do a good job when it comes to nurturing, developing, rewarding, and retaining their high potential employees. In fact, it often seems like they are going out of their way to sabotage their best employees. Of course, most organizations don’t intentionally try to kill their high potentials. It’s just that many managers don’t know how to manage a high potential, and end up doing well-intended things that get unintended results. Or – in some cases – they actually do set their high potential employees up for failure, as a result of feeling threatened or jealousy. So – if you want to kill your high potentials, just follow these 10 steps!” Locate Dan on Twitter at @greatleadership.

Dana Theus of InPower Coaching contributed Insight: Pride vs. PRIDE. Dana writes, “When we flash our PRIDE around – which to an unsuspecting world can feel like a right cross – we miss a great opportunity to really share our value.” Find Dana on Twitter at @DanaTheus.

David Dye of Trailblaze submitted 5 Ways Pokemon Go Will Make You a Better Leader. David summarizes, “Video games are masterful at drawing out people’s natural, internal motivations. David shares how you can be more effective and influential when you get these same motivations working for you and your team.” Follow David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shared Open Ended Questions Enhance Employee Communication. David writes, “As a leader, you know that engaging employees and helping connect them to your business goals can directly impact the bottom line.  Your internal communication plan can include two-way communication vehicles like feedback channels and listening sessions to help accomplish this.” Discover David on Twitter at @thoughtpartner.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed Leaders Fighting Fires: What Darby Did. Jill shares, “At some point, all leaders are faced with tense situations. Learn how one leader showed a strong heart in a life-and-death situation.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center shared A Definition of Leadership for These Pressing Times. Jesse Lyn recaps, “What’s your definition of leadership? We need a clear, unbiased definition to form a common language. In this post, Jesse Stoner takes you through her journey of digging down to the root of the word, stripping away assumptions, and creating a definition of leadership for the pressing conversations we need to have. Unexpectedly, this process revealed a different lens for understanding leadership in today’s world. This post has sparked a lot of conversation, and you are invited to add your voice.” Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted Why Strong Leaders Have the Courage to Show Vulnerability. Joel recaps: “Not being afraid to show your vulnerabilities shows confidence and authenticity, which encourages respect and openness in your team. This attitude creates a culture of learning from mistakes and using everyone’s strengths to best move forward.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog shared Applying Toyota Kata to Agile Retrospectives. John summarizes, “Creating a culture where it is expected that any improvement ideas are tested and evaluated is one of the most important changes on the path to a company that will be able to continually improve. If not, what happens is some changes are good, many are not and soon people lose faith that any effort is worth it because they see how poor the results are.” Find John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference contributed Business Leaders Raising Political Voices. Jon shares, “Dangers exist for businesses standing up for certain political issues, especially with the polarization present today. However, business can be a voice for positive change, and employees and customers may now expect business leaders to raise their rational voice in an environment of stalemate and divisiveness.” Follow Jon on Twitter at @thindifference.

Julie Baron of The Thought Board shared Get More Attention: Do’s & Don’ts for Working with the Media. Julie writes, “Want to increase the visibility of your business? Perhaps you seek to educate people about your service, inform them about your events, or change their opinion about your price. Maybe you want to be seen as an industry thought leader or you want to generate business leads or prospective employee interest. No matter the goal, media coverage is a great way to get more attention. These do’s and don’ts for working with the media will boost your chances of coverage success.” Discover The Thought Board on Twitter at @commwrks.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders contributed 6 Reasons Your Training Program Isn’t Working. Karin recaps, “Training programs are great, but sometimes mask the deeper issues. Karin shares six reasons why your training program may not be as effective as you’d hoped..” Follow Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services LLC submitted When You Need to Really Listen. Mary Jo summarizes, “Leaders can always listen more, but there are times they really need to listen at a deeper level.” Follow Mary Jo on Twitter at @mjasmus.

Mary Ila Ward of Horizon Point Consulting contributed Hills in the Heat: Why You Have to do the Hard Stuff to Run and Lead Well. She recaps, “Running and leading have many overlapping lessons.  As the author sets out to train for a marathon, she reflects on how doing the hard stuff strengthens success in running and leading.” Discover Mary Ila on Twitter at @maryilaward.

Mary Schaefer shared  3 Ways to Improve Employee Engagement. Mary continues, “Are you getting everything you can from your focus on employee engagement? You may make more impact by rewiring how you think about it” Find Mary on Twitter at @maryschaefer.

Michael Lee Stallard of Michael Lee Stallard submitted 3 Ways to Lead Like Lincoln. Michael shares, “Abraham Lincoln had a talent for converting detractors into loyal supports. These three elements of his leadership and communication style explain how he did it.” Follow Michael on Twitter at @michaelstallard.

Miki Saxon of MAPping Company Success contributed Golden Oldies: Narcissism and Leadership. Miki writes, “Narcissism has always been problematic for leaders. However, it’s not about having narcissistic traits; it’s about how you choose to manage them.” Discover Miki on Twitter at @optionsanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted The Curious Leader. Neal recaps, “By adopting a curious mindset, your leadership style goes hand-in-hand with curiosity. Many curious leaders are destined for the C-Suite due to their curious nature in asking questions and exploring ideas for opportunities.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader contributed Why Leaders Should Build the Castle First. Paul summarizes, “A great leader showed how to create a positive culture in the midst of a negative one.” Follow Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust shared Thrown Under the Bus? 8 Tips on Dealing with Unfair Criticism. Randy writes, “Sooner or later we all get thrown under the bus and criticized unfairly, and how you respond shapes the perceptions people have of you as a leader. In this enlightening post, Randy Conley shares 8 strategies for responding to unfair criticism in a healthy and productive way.” Find Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders contributed Are you really a leader? An easy way to tell. Robyn shares, “we are truly leaders when what we do inspires those around us to be, do, and achieve more.” Follow Robyn on Twitter at @thoughtfulldrs.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row submitted Tough Decision? Use Your Secret Weapon – Values. In this piece, Shelley reminds us that we have a built-in secret weapon we can apply when making a tough decision—our values. Discover Shelley on Twitter at @shelleyrow.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership provided Why ‘Politically Correct’ Is Not A Four Letter Word. Susan explains, “The more visible your leadership, the more important it is for you to be mindful of your words and deliberate with your messages. But personal honesty and even transparency is not the ultimate antidote to the political correctness that has polarized us and degraded our trust in politics. In fact, it may even be dangerous.” Follow Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer submitted What It  Takes to Overcome Distractions in the Workplace. Tanveer continues, ” A lesson from Olympic rowers reveals a powerful message for leaders on how they can help their employees to overcome workplace distractions.” Discover Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Tom Magness of Leader Business contributed How NOT to Micromanage. Tom summarizes, “Successful leaders stay out of the weeds by avoiding telling their team HOW to do things.  Instead, provide clarity on INTENT, essentially the WHAT and WHY, and allow the team to figure out the rest.  The results (buy-in, empowerment, innovation) are a true game-changer.” Follow Tom on Twitter at @leaderbusiness.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership submitted Getting Fairness Right. Wally recaps, “People won’t give you their best unless they feel like you’re treating them fairly. There are many ways to get fairness wrong.  Here’s what you should know to get fairness right.” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

Improve Yourself: July Leadership Development Carnival

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

leadership-carnival-5-300x134How time flies. Half the year is already gone and the rest will fly by even faster.

In the meantime, here’s the July Leadership Development Carnival to help you grow in Q3.

Art Petty of About Money Management and Leadership provided Reinventing the Organization and Leadership for a Digital Era. Art writes, “The emerging digital and technology-driven world demands that we rethink everything about how we manage, lead, structure and run our organizations. It also challenges us to rethink our own approach to leveling up in our career. In this article, I explore 7 key characteristics of organizations that will survive and thrive in this era.” Discover Art on Twitter at @artpetty.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provided Com-MIT to Your Most Important Thing. Beth recaps, “Feeling overwhelmed? While you may feel like you have many important things to do, there should be one or two that stand out. Focus on those.” Find Beth on Twitter at @bethbeutler.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Do What Great Bosses Do . Chris summarizes: “Great bosses inspire growth, ensure accountability, spur teamwork and more. What more does a great boss do?” Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership provided How to Manage Yourself so Your Boss Won’t Have To. Dan recaps, “Here’s a simple model that can be used to teach leaders how to “let go” and empower their employees to make their own decisions.” Locate Dan on Twitter at @greatleadership.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shared  The Secret Respectfully Authentic Leaders Know. This post explores how respectful authenticity is about this constant process of being truthful – first with yourself and then with others.  To say the things that need to be said.  And to do it in a kind and respectful way.  Being authentic isn’t about saying whatever you think or feel. Discover David on Twitter at @thoughtpartner.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed How do you change when your leader changes?. Jill shares, “Many people find themselves – or put themselves – in a precarious position when their familiar leader leaves the company. Here are some tips to ensure you don’t get distracted from the importance of realigning with the new boss.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jennifer Molina of the Institute for Corporate Productivity, Inc. (i4cp) provided Nearly 70%of Executive Teams Use Workforce Analytics. Jennifer shares, “Nearly 70% of executive teams use workforce analytics to make strategic business decisions. The Institute for Corporate Productivity and ROI Institute have released the results of a new research study, which looks at positive trends and the state of human capital analytics. The study features case studies on Google, LinkedIn, HSBC, and Intel.” Tweet i4cp at @i4cp.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center shared The 4 Decision Styles: When to Involve Others in Decisions. Jesse Lyn recaps, “Leaders are called to make countless decisions each day and must determine which to make on their own and when to involve others. Most people are guided by personal preference. Some are naturally decisive and others prefer dialogue. You actually have 4 choices, and being intentional about when to make decisions on your own and when to involve others can save you a lot of time and headaches.” Follow Jesse Lyn on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds contributed Effective Leaders Execute. Jim summarizes: “This is a story about a rural-born and raised country girl who though hard work and adversity rose to become one of Canada’s most respected CEOs. Her ability to connect with people yet also focus on achieving results sets her apart from many other corporate leaders. Meet Annette Verschueren.” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted 4 Ways to Develop Effective Working Relationships. Joel recaps: “Paul just got a new job in which he is overseeing a staff of twenty people. The culture of his new company encourages building of relationships, connecting and caring. Here are 4 ways that Paul can begin to immediately learn how to develop and build working relationships.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter shared Support Theatre. John summarizes, “Support theatre provides the appearance of supporting customers when in fact it is just treating customers poorly based on a management system that disrespects customers. It is a similar idea to security theatre. Find John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference contributed Career Chapters: The Next One. Jon shares, “No storyline is straight and narrow. Jon Mertz shares the chapters of his career story and why it’s important to exhibit patience and let a story develop.” Follow Jon on Twitter at @thindifference.

Julie Baron of The Thought Board shared CEO’s Share Best Advice Received. Julie writes, ” It’s not uncommon for leaders to say they made it to the top with the help of some great advice along the way. So we asked some of our friends with CEO titles, “What’s the best advice you have ever received?” Learn from leaders in marketing, HR technology, structural engineering, corporate catering, innovation consulting, entrepreneurial education, benefits administration, and construction.” Discover The Thought Board on Twitter at @commwrks.

Julie Winkle-Giulioni of Julie Winkle-Giulioni submitted Leadership Advice…for the Ages (ALL Ages).  Julie summarizes, “Despite the popular media’s focus on differences among the generations, recent research suggests that when it comes to workplace priorities and beliefs, we share far more similarities than differences. And this is good news for leaders who understand and can appeal to what all employees have in common.” Find Julie on Twitter at @julie_wg.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders contributed One Common Interviewing Mistake that will Cost You the Job. Karin recaps, “It’s important to show passion for the job you aspire to—not just the title or the perks. But don’t cross the line of sounding desperate.” Follow Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Lisa Kohn of Chatsworth Consulting Group submitted Why a Pink Flamingo is an Essential Leadership Tool. Lisa summarizes, “There are many essential leadership skills, and bringing a sense of lightness to the teams and organizations (and families) we lead is certainly one of them.” Find Lisa on Twitter at @thoughtfulldrs.

Marcella Bremer of Leadership and Change Magazine shared Christian Felber and the Economy for the Common Good. Marcella describes the post: “What is the role of a company in the universe? It is to serve the common good, says Christian Feller. His scorecard checks whether products are meaningful, sold ethically, produced in a sustainable way, and so on. How are you contributing to the common good? And your organization?” Locate Marcella on Twitter at @marcellabremer.

Miki Saxon of MAPping Company Success contributed Ducks in a Row: Millennials (and Everybody) Need Quiet. Miki writes, “Talent attraction and retention are critical to success. New research shows that it’s not necessarily fancy perks, a la Google, that attracts and keeps great talent, but something that costs far less and can be more creatively supplied.” Discover Miki on Twitter at @optionsanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted Leaders Allowing Employees to Break Rules for Creativity. Neal recaps, “Leaders of creative and innovative businesses and organizations always have rules put in place. They know that employees will over-step these rules in order to generate great ideas, create and produce them for breakthrough results. By doing so, leaders have some control of their employees and the work they do.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader contributed 5 Ways to be a Buffer in a Negative Culture. Paul summarizes, “A great leader showed how to create a positive culture in the midst of a negative one.” Follow Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Paula Kiger of Perspicacity submitted 3 Work Lessons from Early Intervention. Paula shares, “Have you ever had to raise an issue with someone who reports to you? Although there is no way to eliminate the anxiety, which is part of the process anytime feedback is given, one key is to have clear lines of communication all of the time, not just at feedback time.” Discover Paula on Twitter at @biggreenpen.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust shared 3 Ways To Be Everyone’s Favorite Manager. Randy writes, “Management is a tough gig and at times it can seem like you’re always playing the role of the bad guy. It doesn’t have to be that way, says Randy Conley, and in this article he shares three practical ways you can become everyone’s favorite manager.” Find Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row submitted Walk a Labyrinth to Learn Leadership Discipline. In this piece, Shelley shares observations and lessons about leadership that she gleaned while walking a labyrinth. Discover Shelley on Twitter at @shelleyrow.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership provided 3 Things Leaders Need to Know About Forgiveness. Susan explains, “Trust is a leader’s currency, and the willingness to forgive and the courage to responsibly ask for forgiveness sets the value of that currency. Said another way, without forgiveness trust is fragile.” Follow Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer shared Understanding What Drives Us To Push Ahead. Tanveer asks, “How do we motivate our employees – and ourselves – when the focus is simply on getting today’s work done?” Find Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Tom Magness of Leader Business contributed Break Out the Books…and Sharpen the Pencils! Tom summarizes, “This post highlights the importance of leaders in two critical skills – reading and writing.  Using inspiration from the CEO of the US Navy in his charge to his “troops” to raise the bar in these two areas, we look at the importance for doing both as professionals and as those committed to continuous learning.  As the blog reveals…this is ‘Leader Business’.” Follow Tom on Twitter at @leaderbusiness.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership submitted 4 Vital Truths of Team Culture. Wally recaps, “There’s lots of good advice on team culture. Here are four vital truths you can’t hear often enough.” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

Willy Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts shared Authenticity in the Workplace: Why I’ve Gotta be Me. Willy writes, “There is a lot of discussion about staying true to your “authentic self”.  This post examines how that may not always be the very best strategy and that a better option is for a mix of sincerity and empathy.” Follow Willy on Twitter at @coachforexecs.

February Leadership Development Carnival

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

leadership-carnival-5-300x134The Leadership Development Carnival is alive and well this month at The UPwards Leader.

Click on over for some interesting insights.

A Potpourri of Leadership Information

Wednesday, November 4th, 2015

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It’s always handy to have something useful/uplifting in an easy-to-access format to read when you have a few minutes here and there.

To that end, here is the November Leadership Development Carnival to save on your phone for your edification.

Enjoy!

Anne Perschel of Germane Consulting submitted How to Manage Your Ego – Leaders Guide. Anne shares, “Trouble happens when your ego takes control and causes you to run amuck. To make sure your wise self is driving the bus, follow the Leaders Guide.” Locate Anne on Twitter at @bizshrink.

Bill Treasurer of Giant Leap Consulting contributed Risk-Taking Advice from America’s Greatest Mountaineer. Bill recaps, “Ed Viesturs has summited Mount Everest seven times, helped with the ill-fated Everest expedition in 1996, and climbed all 14 of the world’s 8000 meter summits. He certainly knows a few things about taking risks – and you don’t have to be a mountain climber to benefit from his advice.” Follow Bill on Twitter at @btreasurer.

Bruce Harpham of Project Management Hacks submitted How To Develop Your Business Acumen. Bruce summarizes, “To lead, we need to know our environment and translate that information into insights. This article shares a three step process to build up your business acumen.” Discover Bruce on Twitter at @PMPhacks.

Chery Gegelman of Giana Consulting shared Maximize Your Purpose with an Altered Path. Chery writes, “Faced with or in the midst of something you didn’t plan?  Peace for your heart, mind and soul:  Catalysts for maximizing your purpose are often disguised as distractions and delays.” Chery is on Twitter at @gianaconsulting.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Change is Hard. Chris describes the post as: “a personal example and a client example of how change is, well, hard. It’s not fun – at least at the start. It’s work – but it’s worth it.” Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership submitted Stop Criticizing and Start Leading Your Youngest Workers. In this post, consultant and speaker Claudia St. John provides advice for leaders on leading younger workers.” Find Dan on Twitter at @GreatLeadership.

David Dye of Trailblaze, Inc., shared How to Lead a Team – Look Here. David asks, “Do you have employees or colleagues that irritate you? (Hint: We all do.) Here’s a specific strategy you can use to build productive teams – even with those people.” Discover David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center provided Are You Unconsciously Perpetuating an Outdated View of Leadership?. Jesse summarized: “When I noticed that over 90% of popular leadership quotes are by men, I did an experiment. I created a new list with 85% quotes by women. Guess what, the list is very popular AND no one noticed the skew. Does any of this matter? I think it does, and here’s why.” Follow Jesse on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jill Malleck of Ephipany at Work contributed In Praise of Powerful Admin Assistants. Jill shared, “Many leaders are overwhelmed because they don’t have an assistant, or if they do, they aren’t partnering well with them. Here are some tips to make this role pivotal to your organization’s success.” Connect with Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds submitted Should Executives be Allowed to Telecommute. Jim says, “The traditional organizational pyramid has been around a long time. An increasingly outdated concept in a global economy, the Pyramid is accompanied by the physical presence of employees within organizational silos. Managers want their staff within arms-reach. Enter the teleworking concept with its supporters and detractors, each making their separate cases. But what about executives being able to telecommute?” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted Are You Afraid to Speak Up at Meetings When You Have Good Ideas? Joel recaps: “Casey has become The Reluctant Leader. She feels she is not being noticed for all her hard work and accomplishments. Yet she doesn’t feel comfortable bragging, talking about how great she is, or publicly calling attention to all her accomplishments. Here are three ideas to help just start the raising of her profile.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference sent Shifting from Digital Native to Digital Citizen. Jon summarizes: “What’s the difference between a digital native and a digital citizen? And why is the shift that is occurring so important?​” Discover Jon on Twitter @ThinDifference.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders gave us Do You Hear Them Now? 11 Signs You Have a Listening Culture. Karin discusses her current work with CEOs/CFOs of large manufacturing companies, and how it has focused on development of  a listening culture. This post provides readers an opportunity to chime in. Find Karin on Twitter at @letsgrowleaders.

Lisa Kohn of The Thoughtful LeadersTM Blog provided Don’t Buy Into the Drama. In this piece, Lisa shares shares: “as leaders we can remember to do our best to calm the worry and ease the anxiety, so that we have the energy to handle the real issues and challenges when they actually arise.” Follow Lisa on Twitter at @ThoughtfulLdrs.

Mary Ila Ward of Horizon Point Consulting submitted 3 Steps to Winning a Best Place to Work Award. Mary Ila writes, “At the end of the day, an organization wins a best place to work award because employees feel valued.  This post gives you a framework for building a company culture where employees love what they do and find value in doing it.” Discover Mary Ila on Twitter at @maryilaward.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaboative Services, LLC contributed What Happens When You Have a Real Conversation. Mary Jo says, “There is a lot of action going on in our organizations, but not a lot of real conversation. Here are some reasons to slow down and have dialogs in service to more effective action with rich learning and deep connection.” Find Mary Jo on Twitter at @mjasmus.

Miki Saxon of RampUp Solutions, Inc., contributed Ducks in a Row: Culture Made Easy. Miki continues, “Culture is recognized as a determining factor in success. In the interest of the ‘keep it simple’ approach, here is the basic premise and associated action needed to build a great culture.” Discover Miki on Twitter at @OptionSanity.

Neal Burgis of Burgis Successful Solutions shared Leaders Shifting Gears to Hire Introverts. Neal summarizes, “Leaders overlook introverts for various positions. Introverts, also known as Ambiverts are those who have a lot more of the strengths, skills and talent to generate and create ideas for problem-solving. They also interact longer in team interactions longer than the average introvert. Follow Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of The Upwards Leader contributed Are You a Vision Caster? Paul continues, “vision is no good if, as a leader, you have it and don’t give it away.” Discover Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust provided Are You a Boss or a Leader? 7 Ways to Tell. Randy shares, “Anyone can be a boss, but it takes special attention and focus to be a leader. In this post Randy Conley shares seven key differences that make someone a leader rather than just a boss.” Follow Randy on Twitter at @randyconley.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts Of Leadership submitted 7 Steps to Break the Cycle of Inaction. Susan asks, “Have you ever had a really great idea – something you knew you should do – and yet somehow you did not act on it? Unfortunately, when you get caught in the cycle of inaction, the tendency is to remain at rest. Here are 7 steps to break through that cycle and put the law of motion to work in your favor.” Find Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Nasser Leadership Coach contributed Understanding the Power of Our Words. Tanveer summarizes, “Learn how the words we use to communicate our message to those we lead can either inspire others to believe in their potential … or take the wind out of their sails in bringing their best to the table.” Locate Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership shared 5 Praise Pitfalls. Wally writes, “Praise is a powerful tool for any boss. But, like any tool, it can be misused.” Follow Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

William G. Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts provided Great Business Stories. Willy says this post is “a look at how to ‘craft’ a great story from your own experiences for the purpose of influencing others in business. This post includes 4 key steps to constructing great business stories, as well as well some specific storytelling tips to make your stories more impactful and memorable.” Find Willy on Twitter at @coachforexecs.

October Leadership Development Carnival

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

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The Leadership Development Carnival is hosted at home this month; home being Becky Robinson’s Lead Change.

It being October, Becky used a sports analogy, saying the posts are home runs, which they are

However, October means Halloween to me, which is also fitting, considering the number of treats offered and nary a trick to be found.

So without further ado, read, learn and enjoy.

Anne Perschel of Germane Consulting submitted Lead with a Smile and Discover What Happens. Anne shares, “Ed, an Engineering Director, has a habit of mind that immediately sees what could go wrong in any given situation. There’s always something, and often lots of somethings, that could go wrong. But one day, Ed saw the lighter side of a situation, and…read what happened.” Locate Anne on Twitter at @bizshrink.

Bill Treasurer of Giant Leap Consulting contributed Opening the Thought-Shifting Door. Bill writes, ” Leaders need to know how to shift people’s thinking. Real opportunities can be found in convincing people to become imaginative by freeing them from narrow, negative, or habitual thinking. You may be surprised to hear that encouraging thought-shifting is not as difficult or complicated as it may seem.” Follow Bill on Twitter at @btreasurer.

Bruce Harpham of Project Management Hacks submitted How To Lead Virtual Teams. Bruce summarizes, “How do you lead a team that is distributed across the country or across the world? In this article, I share best practices for leaders leading a virtual team including recommended tools.” Discover Bruce on Twitter at @PMPhacks.

Chris Edmonds of the Purposeful Culture Group contributed Where the Human Spirit Goes to Die. Chris describes the post: “Our workplaces – around the globe – are not inspiring, engaging, productive environments for us to work in. Chris sheds light on a study that shows what people need – and how to create it.” Follow Chris on Twitter at @scedmonds.

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership submitted 10 Ways to Keep  Cool and Composed. Dan writes, “When a leader lets their emotions get the better of them they can quickly develop a reputation as volatile, moody, defensive, or having a lack of leadership presence. Unfortunately, all it takes is one public outburst. What can a leader do to keep cool under pressure?” Find Dan on Twitter at @GreatLeadership.

David Dye of Trailblaze, Inc., shared A Secret of Success at Leadership and Life. In this article, David shares a powerful metaphor for leadership which contrasts confusion and clarity. Discover David on Twitter at @davidmdye.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of the Seapoint Center provided Are Your Employees Turning You Into a Helicopter Manager?. Jesse summarized: “What happens when Millennials who are used to ‘helicopter parents’ enter the workforce? You may be turning into a helicopter boss without realizing it. Here’s why, what they really need, and what you can do as a manager.” Follow Jesse on Twitter at @JesseLynStoner.

Jill Malleck of Epiphany at Work contributed Four Ways to Be an Active Leader. Jill shares, “busy leaders can find themselves only responding to this and that. True leadership means shaking it up and making new moves. Here’s 4 easy ways to do that.” Find Jill on Twitter at @epiphanyatwork.

Jim Taggart of Changing Winds submitted Black Swans: The Achilles Heel of Leadership. Jim says, “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if the world were predictable–or at least somewhat predictable? It would certainly make the job of top organizational leaders and politicians in power that much easier. But that’s not how it is; it never has been in fact.” Find Jim on Twitter at @72keys.

Joel Garfinkle of the Career Advancement Blog submitted Is it a Myth? Can you Actually Achieve Work-Life Balance? Joel recaps: “Balancing work and a personal life is becoming an increasingly common problem in today’s hyper-competitive world. Here are ten strategies for creating and maintaining work-life balance.” Discover Joel on Twitter at @JoelGarfinkle.

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog provided What to Do To Create a Continual Improvement Culture. John explains, “Leaders must create systems that encourage others to succeed and make the organization more effective. When leaders allow themselves to be removed from what is really going on in the organization they damage the organization. In order to build an organization that inspires people to be creative and engaged a leader needs to build a management system that makes that a reality.” Follow John on Twitter at @curiouscat_com.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference sent The Diverse Tales of Kickstarter and Volkswagen. Jon sumarizes: “Trust is not an intangible. ​It’​s concrete in what it can do and what it can destroy when misused.​ What leadership lessons can we learn from these two tales of trust playing out in mainstream media?​” Discover Jon on Twitter @ThinDifference.

Karin Hurt of Let’s Grow Leaders shared What Happens When We Really Listen. She summarizes “Real listening transforms us. I was blessed by someone “really listening” to me recently.” Locate Karin on Twitter at @LetsGrowLeaders.

Lexie Martin of Leadership Directions sent Seven Leadership Superpowers Managers Can Use to Inspire, Engage and Retain their Gen Y EmployeesIn this in-depth guide, Lexie shares how and when managers of all ages can use support, vision, progress, balance, coaching, humility, and make real connections to reduce turnover and improve performance.

Lisa Kohn of The Thoughtful LeadersTM Blog provided For Greater Leadership, Lose These Two Words. In this piece, Lisa shares shares a common two-word phrase that many of us overuse and that we need to stop saying. It lessens our credibility and hurts us. Follow Lisa on Twitter at @ThoughtfulLdrs.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services, LLC, contributed Meeting them where they are. This post explains: Whatever someone has done that annoys you isn’t relevant in the present moment, and it doesn’t help to judge others by their past behaviors. The secret to better work relationships is to meet others where they are. Find Mary Jo on Twitter at @mjasmus.

Miki Saxon of RampUp Solutions, Inc, contributed Ducks in a Row: The What and How of Culture. Miki continues, “Everybody recognizes that changing culture in a large enterprise is difficult.But why is it that the most critical action required in changing culture is rarely, if ever, mentioned?” Discover Miki on Twitter at @OptionSanity.

Neal Burgis, Ph.D. of Burgis Successful Solutions submitted Believe You are Creative? Neal summarizes: “To be a leader in a creative and innovative organization, you must learn to be creative. Here are some basics to help get you started.” Find Neal on Twitter at @exec_solutions.

Paul LaRue of  The UPWards Leader contributed 7 Encouraging Signs That You’re On Target. Paul believes, “If you doubt that you’re progressing towards your goals, a look at these markers will show you that you’re on track.” Learn more about Paul on Twitter at @paul_larue.

Randy Conley of Leading With Trust submitted Your First Five Steps When Leading a New Team. Randy shares: “You only get one chance to make a first impression when taking on a new leadership role, so it’s critically important you start on the right foot. This post provides helpful advice that will get you started on the path to success.” Follow Randy on Twitter at @RandyConley.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts Of Leadership submitted The Alternative to Fixing Poor Performance. Susan explains: “Fixing people is exhausting, because you never will be done. But there’s an alternative: leading people to own their results and holding them accountable for being their best.” Find Susan on Twitter at @susanmazza.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer shared Learning To Focus On What Matters Most. He says this post is, “a look at what leaders need to focus on in order to succeed at motivating their employees in bringing their very best to the work they do.” Follow Tanveer on Twitter at @tanveernaseer.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership contributed When a Team Member Brings You an Idea. Wally writes, “People have ideas all the time, even at work. So why don’t they share them? How can you change that situation? ” Find Wally on Twitter at @wallybock.

May 2015 Leadership Development Carnival

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

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After spending six hours on the phone with tech support and doing everything else in the other four I realized I had no energy to write something intelligent, let alone engaging.

Which is OK, because I have 20 intelligent, engaging posts to share, whether you agree with them or not.

So without more ado, welcome to the May 2015 edition of the Leadership Development Carnival focused on Leading Yourself.

Enjoy!

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